How To Approach A Dog Safely

Henry Says, “Hello” Childen’s Book Review

Henry Says, Hello book review with Kilo the Pug

We were thrilled to get a beautiful gift from fellow blogger and author, Sarah Parker (a.k.a. Sadie). I had heard about her children’s book, Henry Says, “Hello”, featuring here adorable dog Henry.  I was very keen to read and review it.

Henry Says, “Hello” is a lovely true-to-life story filled with important and potentially life-saving lessons. The book can be used as a teaching tool for parents and teachers, to guide children on how to properly say “hello” to dogs and avoid getting bitten. My rescue dog Kilo the Pug is extremely cute, so both children and adults often want to run up and pat him. Unfortunately, he is very nervous of strangers and can react badly. I am so happy when they know to stop and ask to greet him safely and give him his space.

Henry says "hello" to little boy

Sadie is an animal shelter volunteer, pet blogger, and pet owner. She’s passionate about helping people and pets live in harmony. She hopes Henry Says, “Hello” will help guide adults and children when meeting new animals and encourage responsible pet ownership. As an owner of both an overly friendly dog, Henry and a timid puppy mill rescue dog, Reese, Sarah has seen first hand how different dogs can react to new situations.

Henry and Reese pose in back of truck

Reese and Henry taken by Oak & Myrrh Photography www.oakandmyrrh.com

Quote From The Author

“Henry’s sister, Reese, is fearful and anxious – especially when something or someone surprises her.  When Henry and Reese are out for their walks, children are excited to see them and want to play with them. Sometimes the children will ask if it’s okay to meet the dogs – other times, they just make a beeline straight for them.  I constantly find myself either thanking the kids for asking permission or explaining why they should.
two boys walk Henry and Reese in field

We walk in different areas and meet new children all the time.  I remember thinking; I have this speech about how to greet dogs memorized!  That’s when it occurred to me to write a book that would help children when meeting dogs and share how to deal with pets in a compassionate and responsible way.

I hope ‘Henry says “Hello” will be a fun way for children and parents to interact and learn why a proper introduction and good manners, when interacting with animals, are so important.  Most children have wonderful memories of their childhood pets and hopefully, this book will encourage and foster the special bond between children and animals.” – Sadie

girl walks Reese to say "hello" to boy

Preventing Dog Bites

Preventing dog bites is easy when you have the right tools and knowledge. Sadly many innocent dogs face euthanasia for bites that were preventable and triggered unintentionally.

Henry kisses little boy

According to the AVMA Dog Bite Prevention webpage:

  • Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the U.S. are bitten by dogs.
  • Every year, more than 800,000 Americans receive medical attention for dog bites; at least half of them are children.
  • Children are, by far, the most common victims of dog bites and are far more likely to be severely injured. According to the Center for Disease Control, dog bites were the 11th leading cause of nonfatal injury to children ages 1-4, 9th for ages 5-9 and 10th for ages 10-14 from 2003-2012.
  • Most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities.

Read: Dog Bite Prevention

Kilo the pug head tilt for camera

Sadie explains why not all dogs are ready or willing to be approached. Just like humans, dogs may have a wide range of feelings and past situations. Some may have been abused, neglected or not properly trained and socialized by past owners. Other may be elderly, ill or sore. If a child doesn’t approach and treat a dog carefully, there may be disastrous results.

Henry Says, "Hello" book cover

About Henry Says, “Hello”

In the book, Henry is a happy, friendly, white curly-haired dog that wants to teach children how to say “hello” to dogs. Throughout his story, you encounter many types of dogs. Some are friendly and playful while others are scared and need extra space. Henry teaches children what body-language signs to look for and how to act respectfully around his doggy friends.

Henry sits with boy on haystack

Henry’s “sister,” Reese, is a rescue dog adopted out of a puppy-mill. She was in dire need of rehabilitation from the Parker family. Henry has helped Reese to learn to be happy and not fearful of the world anymore. Part of her reintroduction into the world was through positive socialization. Teaching children how to read a dog’s body language and say “hello” may help fearful or traumatized dogs have a smoother transition.

Read: Say NO To Puppy Mills

Henry Says "Hello" illustration of Henry laying down

“Henry sat near the window, and watched children walk by; he knew what to wish for, and looked to the sky. The stars twinkled brightly, all of them knew, and worked their magic, to make Henry’s wish come true.”

The book features easy to read rhymes and beautiful illustrations of Henry and Reese and their real-life friends. Sarah also included a handy list of 8 tips for saying “hello” and a matching game at the end of the story and encourages parents to review these with their children regularly. Henry Says, “Hello” will delight and enlighten your child and pass on valuable lessons.

Parker family walking dogs in field

I highly recommend Sadie’s book for children and dog lovers.

A large portion of proceeds generated from the sale of this book will be donated to Animal Rescue Efforts, Medical Care for animals, and learning programs for children.

Henry Says, ‘Hello’ is now available online at sadieandcostudio.com and Amazon.

*Henry says, “Hello” Campaign Photos 2014 Generously contributed by Garrie Russell of Nexus Photography

Summary
Reviewer
Angela Casullo
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Henry Says ‘Hello’ Children's book
Author Rating
5

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